I am Born Drowning

Imagine a drowning man out to sea. He is splashing and waving and yelling for help. Near the man is a small boat and on that boat is a man in a blue and red leotard with his underwear on the outside and a giant “S” on the front; Superman.

Superman throws a rope out to save the drowning man, but the drowning man is panicking and cannot grab, or even see the rope. Superman sits by and hopes the man will take the rope but he isn’t really invested in the situation and won’t fly over to save the drowning man. In the last moments, in trying to save the drowning man, Superman yells “if you don’t take the rope, you’ll die”.

One can only suppose one of two things: that was not Superman and the assumption we had that Superman could have flown over and saved him was wrong, else it was Superman and he just didn’t care to save the drowning man. If your average Christian apologist is correct we are born drowning with Superman at our side offering us a rope that we can’t see, and then being told that it’s our fault.

For those that don’t like metaphors, Superman is God and drowning is being in a world full of natural things that cause suffering. The rope is salvation through accepting the quasi-sacrifice (he comes back to life) of Jesus Christ to absolve us of our responsibility. Our panic, so far that I can see, if the average Christian apologist is correct, is our critical thinking and moral sense.

I didn’t say we were born being kicked by Hitler; this has nothing to do with human freewill. Our drowning is earthly disease and natural disasters and famine etc. The Genesis account of the Fall caused our drowning. When Adam first sinned he brought great evil into the world, and every generation today must live with that. We are drowning in the legacy of a sinner.

It wouldn’t make sense to call this ‘unjust’ or ‘immoral’ if this was the natural way of things, blind and without knowledge. But that is not the world the average Christian apologist asserts. The world is actually at the whims of God, who could remove the Fallen state of Earth and abolish this suffering and stop us drowning in the legacy of a long-lost relative. God could fly over and save us.

God clearly hasn’t done that.

We are still drowning. So we can assume that if God could, but hasn’t, saved us that He simply doesn’t care to. But the average Christian apologist says that God is all loving, so He must care to. But He doesn’t do it. But He can do it, and wants to do it. But He doesn’t. I can’t make all three of these facts true, but the fact of our suffering is evidential.

The average Christian apologist tells us of our offer of salvation; God helping us while never actually stopping us or the ones we love from drowning. If we believe that the temporary death—by murder—of Jesus Christ is a good thing. This is our publicist-inspired, half-assed rope of salvation.

We are blind to see this offer, I agree with the average Christian apologist on this point. I cannot see how a human sacrifice is a good thing. I cannot see how a murdered human being is someone who I can throw my responsibility, or Adam’s responsibility, on to. I cannot see how the temporary death of one person is more important than the permanent death of everyone else. I cannot see what I need to see to be saved. That’s not my fault.

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11 thoughts on “I am Born Drowning”

  1. Thank you!
    I’ve scheduled a few old ones to come up for a few days so that I don’t have to maintain the blog — I’m supposed to be working today, but my boss still hasn’t turned up.

    Thank you for sending me the old posts. It’s great having some the good ones back (this is one of my favourites too).

  2. When a parent insists that their child do a thing that is very difficult, and not just do it for that child, it doesn’t mean that the parent is a bad parent – or that they don’t care. They know that the thing their child must do, or go through, on their own, will help that child grow up to be a better person.
    I don’t understand why God makes us “do” difficult things; “go through” difficult things, but He is my parent – and I trust that He is making me go through this difficult stuff so that I will learn, grow, and become a better spirit because of it. I have been around the block with life several times, and I can see myself “growing” in this process.

    1. I understand that you think God has your best interest at heart. And if I grant that, the only way He can need you to suffer at times is because He is not omnipotent. Sometimes suffering is the only way to learn. Focus on “only”, because if an omnipotent God wanted a suffering-free way to teach us He could write on. I’ve granted that He is benevolent, so He must not be omnipotent.

      However, if I am right about God–that He doesn’t exist–then the reason for your strength and your growth and your progress and overcoming alcoholism is you. You had that.

      1. My Dear,
        God didn’t want a bunch of robots who have no choice but the “love” Him. He wanted separate beings who WANT to love Him, because they have been “grown” up enough to really know what loving means.
        I was also an Atheist at one time in my life. But I certainly was absolutely unable to withstand the pull to drink by myself. When I got this “loving God”, suddenly I was able to withstand the drink’s pull. Weird, huh? It was all about the love – which I think of as a super-natural POWER. Yes, I think of love as a POWER which can propel a person to get back to a balanced and whole state again. I got this POWER simply because I made a decision to allow Jesus to come into my personal space. He brought this love-power with Him. I don’t know how, or why, it was through Him, I just know that that’s what happened.
        robin

        1. I don’t doubt your sincerity. I also believe you understand, to an extent, the person that helped pull you through.
          Would you be willing to consider the possibility that the problem here is an expressive one: that God is very loving and compassionate, but actually -not- infinitely so… to an extent He wants us to suffer so that we are free to not love Him.
          Equally, He is very powerful, but not omnipotent… He can’t create a world free from naturally caused suffering where we are still free to love Him or not?

          Equally, no matter how much a person helps me and makes my life easy, I can still believe (on bad evidence) that they are bad to me. So no matter how much bliss God offered us I’d still be free to not love him, surely?

  3. […] One commenter has asked whether I wish there was a good God and whether I’d want Him to save me. The question is a little confused; I don’t assume I need saving. In fact, it’s a self-fulfilling solution; religion offers both the problem of damnation and solution of salvation. It’s a neat little package. But without religion, you don’t have the issue of damnation so you don’t require the solution. I don’t want to be saved from drowning, because I’m not. (Although, the religious would have you believe I am.) […]

  4. […] One commenter has asked whether I wish there was a good God and whether I’d want Him to save me. The question is a little confused; I don’t assume I need saving. In fact, it’s a self-fulfilling solution; religion offers both the problem of damnation and solution of salvation. It’s a neat little package. But without religion, you don’t have the issue of damnation so you don’t require the solution. I don’t want to be saved from drowning, because I’m not. (Although, the religious would have you believe I am.) […]

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