Brexit and me

I’d like to tell the story of how I became interested in Brexit, back in 2016, only marginally before the vote. In reality, it’s the story of why I didn’t care about Brexit at any point before a critical moment in early 2016. I was born in 1989. Don’t worry, the story doesn’t start there;… Continue reading Brexit and me

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The State of Brexit: Thoughts following the EU elections

Although The Brexit Party won the greatest number of seats in the UK for the EU election, it’s not accurate to see them as the ‘winners’. It is undoubtedly impressive: a party that has existed for only a few weeks has gotten 32% of the seats. However, the European Parliament isn’t something that is ‘won’,… Continue reading The State of Brexit: Thoughts following the EU elections

Why was the 2016 EU Referendum an affront to democracy

Introduction The purpose of this post is to explain how the 2016 EU Referendum didn’t just fail to be democracy at its best, but was democracy delivered so poorly that no democrat should be offering it lip service. Issues of the lies told in the campaigns and breaking of electoral law are both key points… Continue reading Why was the 2016 EU Referendum an affront to democracy

The People’s Vote: a betrayal of who, exactly?

Introduction - breaking faith and riots Theresa May has stood up in Parliament to insist that politicians would “break faith” (BBC News, 2018) with the public if they called for a People’s Vote. It’s a sort of dog whistle for the predictions that a People’s Vote followed by a Remain victory (should we be so… Continue reading The People’s Vote: a betrayal of who, exactly?

What should a democracy look like?

On Thursday 23rd June, the UK undertook a project of direct democracy: a referendum on its membership to the European Union. The result was a 51.9% vote for leaving the EU, a fact we should not ignore. It was a vote, on a day, saying a narrow majority of the British people who voted wanted… Continue reading What should a democracy look like?

The Brexit vote teaches us that we should be practicing how to do referendums

A Guardian columnist named George Monbiot is arguing for more referendums in the UK. His reasoning is pretty good: the problem with the EU Referendum was that it was a large, complex question boiled down to two answers given to a populace inexperienced in referendums. Referendums, especially significant ones, shouldn’t be a ‘learning-on-the-job’ experience; the… Continue reading The Brexit vote teaches us that we should be practicing how to do referendums

An Open Letter to the UK

Dear UK citizen, registered voter or not,   I am writing to you today to tell you to not give up on your new-found political passion just yet. You need to contact your local representatives. Immediately.   We can still stop the Brexit being invoked or shape the negotiations that happen, and we can do… Continue reading An Open Letter to the UK