The Brexit vote teaches us that we should be practicing how to do referendums

A Guardian columnist named George Monbiot is arguing for more referendums in the UK. His reasoning is pretty good: the problem with the EU Referendum was that it was a large, complex question boiled down to two answers given to a populace inexperienced in referendums. Referendums, especially significant ones, shouldn’t be a ‘learning-on-the-job’ experience; the… Continue reading The Brexit vote teaches us that we should be practicing how to do referendums

Bombing Syria? Really? (Part 1: What did it take government 10 hours to say?)

Here comes another mini-series. This time, discussing the UK government’s decision to bomb Syria (if you don’t want to miss an installment, follow me). I am going to keep this relatively short, because I am less well versed in politics. I want to give people who really do understand these ideas the opportunity to set… Continue reading Bombing Syria? Really? (Part 1: What did it take government 10 hours to say?)

The Whining Left, Democracy and Politics of the Future

I voted Labour. Everyone I know who actually voted, voted Labour (unless they voted Green, which is not voting). Except, a lot of people I know who voted haven’t told me who they voted for. They voted Conservative. And I think that is the cause of the protests; because the Conservative voters are quieter, no… Continue reading The Whining Left, Democracy and Politics of the Future

Should Governments Fix the Rates of Foreign Aid?

(This should stimulate an argument) Britain is continuing to not-quite discuss the issue of whether it should be a part of Europe. There are essentially three sides: yes, no and if we can negotiate a better deal for ourselves. But no side, yet, has been clear about the benefits of their view or the problems… Continue reading Should Governments Fix the Rates of Foreign Aid?